Humanities and Social Sciences

For listings of additional courses of interest to engineering students, consult the bulletins of Columbia College; the School of General Studies; the Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation; the Graduate School of Business; and the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences.

COCI CC1101x-CC1102y Introduction to contemporary civilization in the West
4 pts. Lect: 4. Members of faculty.
Taught by members of the Departments of Anthropology, Classics, English and Comparative Literature, French, German, History, Middle East and Asian Languages and Cultures, Philosophy, Political Science, Religion, Slavic Languages, and Sociology; and members of the Society of Fellows. A study in their historical context of major contributions to the intellectual traditions that underpin contemporary civilization. Emphasis is on the history of political, social, and philosophical thought. Students are expected to write at least three papers to complete two examinations, and to participate actively in class discussions.

ECON UN1105x and y Principles of economics
4 pts. Professors Gulati, O'Flaherty, Salanie, and Zaniboni.
Corequisites: ECON UN1155 recitation section with the same instructor. How a market economy determines the relative prices of goods, factors of production, and the allocation of resources and the circumstances under which it does it efficiently. Why such an economy has fluctuations and how they may be controlled. Recitation section required.

ENGL UN1010x or y University writing
3 pts. Members of the faculty.
Teaches general techniques and strategies for academic reading and writing. Students read and discuss a range of published essays, complete regular reading and writing exercises, write several longer essays, and undertake a collaborative research and writing project designed by the class. Students placed in UN1010 whose names fall in the first part of the alphabet must take the course in the fall. Students whose names fall in the second part of the alphabet take the course in the spring. The alphabet will be split somewhere between K and O. The exact place for the split will be posted before fall registration.

Global Core
The Global Core requirement asks students to engage directly with the variety of civilizations and the diversity of traditions that, along with the West, have formed the world and continue to interact in it today. Courses in the Global Core typically explore the cultures of Africa, Asia, the Americas, and the Middle East in an historical context. These courses are organized around a set of primary materials produced in these traditions and may draw from texts or other forms of media, as well as from oral sources or performance. Global Core courses fall into two categories: those that focus on a specific culture or civilization, tracing its existence across a significant span of time; and those that address a common theme or set of analytic questions comparatively (and may include Europe and the West).

HUMA CC1001x-CC1002y Masterpieces of Western literature and philosophy
4 pts. Lect: 4. Members of faculty.
Taught by members of the Departments of Classics, English and Comparative Literature, French, German, Italian, Middle East and Asian Languages and Cultures, Philosophy, Religion, Slavic Languages, and Spanish; and members of the Society of Fellows in the Humanities. Major works by over twenty authors, ranging in time, theme, and genre from Homer to Virginia Woolf. Students are expected to write at least two papers, to complete two examinations each semester, and to participate actively in class discussions.

HUMA UN1121x or y Masterpieces of Western art
3 pts. Lect: 3. Members of faculty.
Discussion and analysis of the artistic qualities and significance of selected works of painting, sculpture, and architecture from the Parthenon in Athens to works of the 20th century.

HUMA UN1123x or y Masterpieces of Western music
3 pts. Lect: 3. Members of faculty.
Popularly known as “Music Hum,” this course aims to instill in students a basic comprehension of the many forms of the Western musical imagination. The course involves students actively in the process of critical listening, both in the classroom and in concerts. Although not a history of Western music, the course is taught in chronological format and includes masterpieces by Josquin des Prez, Monteverdi, Bach, Handel, Mozart, Haydn, Beethoven, Verdi, Wagner, Schoenberg, Stravinsky, Louis Armstrong, and Duke Ellington, among others.